Two scarce riverbank plants

Earlier this month, I took a walk along the River Avon from Conham to Hanham. to check out some of the scarce plants which occur locally in riverbank habitats. The highlight was this Greater Dodder (Cuscuta europaea), a parasite of the Common Nettle (Urtica dioica): the upright green stems are those of the nettle, and the red stems twining around them belong to the dodder.

This is a nationally scarce plant, found in only a handful of areas in southern and central  England. Locally, it occurs in two areas. It is found along the River Avon from Bristol upstream to Bath, and again to the east of Bath into western parts of Wiltshire; its other stronghold is along the River Severn (mainly around Gloucester but with an outlying site near Frampton-on-Severn).

 Dodder

The closely-related Common Dodder (Cuscuta epithymum) also occurs in our area, and is also a scarce plant, despite its name. It is found in heathland and dry grassland and parasitises among other things, species of gorse, heather and thyme. It has smaller flowers, although to be certain of the identity of a dodder specimen, a flower has to be dissected under a microscope, to look at tiny features such as the shape of the minute scales at the base of the inner surface of the flower and the relative length of the sex organs.

Here’s the area where I found the plant photographed above:

Also present in good numbers throughout this section of the Avon was Small Teasel (Dipsacus pilosus), the scarce relative of the ubiquitous Common Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum). In and around Bristol, it is found on the River Avon between Bristol to Bath, on the River Frome in northeast Bristol, on the River Chew, and scattered other localities, often in or on the edge of woodland.

Small Teasel 1 Small Teasel 2
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