Kingsweston Down

I visited Kingsweston Down yesterday: this is the large area of limestone grassland that runs along the top of the ridge which extends southwest from the Blaise Castle estate. Both the north and south sides of the ridge are covered in woodland, so the whole area is quite sheltered. In some places the grassland is nothing to write home about, but there are some quite extensive patches which are either dominated by Upright Brome (Bromus erectus) or rich in herb species, or both.

One of the most abundant herbs at the site is Yellow-rattle (Rhinanthus minor), in the left-hand photo below. This is a classic indicator of good-quality grassland: it’s a common species of old hay meadows, for example. Yellow-rattle is partially parasitic on the roots of grasses. As you can see in the photo, after flowering the calyx which surrounded the flower inflates: inside, the seeds which develop are loose, and when the plant is blown by the wind, they make a rattling noise inside, hence the plant’s name.

 Yellow-rattle  Common Spotted Orchid

The right-hand photo is of a Common Spotted Orchid (Dactylorhiza fuchsii), one of four growing together in one part of the site. Common Spotted Orchid is our commonest orchid, and colonises new sites readily, liking both grassland and woodland edges, so isn’t particularly indicative of a good quality site, unlike many other orchid species. This individual is a little on the pale side, prompting thoughts of the rarer Heath Spotted Orchid (Dactylorhiza maculata), but the shape of the lower lip, with three more or less equal-sized lobes confirms that this is Common Spotted.

Avon Wildlife Trust previously managed the site, and then it was in better condition, with shorter grassland supporting species such as Restharrow (Ononis repens) and Harebell (Campanula rotundifolium). Today the grass here is quite long, and these species are probably crowded out.

The site can be accessed either from the Blaise Castle estate itself, or from footpaths leading in from Coombe Dingle to the south. Here’s a map:

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